ISOGG Autosomal SNP Comparison Chart – DNA Saturdays December 26, 2020

In the past, I mentioned Be Wary When Doing DNA Comparisons Between Different Chipsets – September 22, 2019, specifically the ISOGG Autosomal SNP Comparison Chart: https://isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_SNP_comparison_chart. I also mentioned the wide variations between different chip sets, including those with the same company. For example, “23andMe v2 chip vs. v5 chip, the amount of SNPs in common is 98,965. That’s a far cry from 500K – 900K+ SNPs shared with some other chipsets. The fewer SNPs shared in common, the greater the likelihood of missing a true match or getting a match that isn’t as close as it should be if you were using the same chipset.”

Using the v3 versus the v5 chip from 23andMe is somewhat better – 930,356 SNPs v3 chip compared to other v3 chipsets vs v3/v5 chip comparison 177,138 SNPs in common. I consider both of these examples as apples to oranges. I try to encourage people to buy the various DNA tests on sale to reduce the cost. In a year’s time, there are numerous sales across the different genetic genealogy DNA companies where you can get them at a reasonable price. I seem to be the only advocating this approach. While AncestryDNA and 23andMe don’t allow you to transfer to them, MyHeritageDNA, FamilyTree DNA (FTDNA), and LivingDNA do allow transfers. There are some restrictions with MyHeritageDNA and FTDNA and a minimal cost to do a full upgrade. You can also transfer for free to DNA.Land. With DNA.Land, you can’t order a test so that’s one way to get your raw data on DNA.Land.

If you look at the ISOGG Wiki Autosomal Comparison Chart, most of the companies share a lot fewer SNPs in common with other companies. There are exceptions. One workaround is to use GEDmatch https://www.gedmatch.com/login1.php, pay for one month of $10.00 access to Tier 1 and create a superkit where you combine all of your DNA tests into one combined test. That gives you the best of all companies you have tested with. I would recommend downloading the superkit to your computer as you should be able to upload it later if needed. Don’t know if you could upload a superkit to FTDNA, MyHeritageDNA, or LivingDNA, but you may be able to upload it to DNA.Land. I will test the theory once I get decent home Internet.

About Wichita Genealogist

Originally from Gulfport, Mississippi. Live in Wichita, Kansas now. I suffer Bipolar I, ultra-ultra rapid cycling, mixed episodes. Blog on a variety of topics - genealogy, DNA, mental health, among others. Let's collaborateDealspotr.com
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