AncestryDNA Follow-up – July 17, 2020

As I mentioned in an earlier post – What’s Changing At Ancestry DNA? — Hound on the Hunt, changes are coming to AncestryDNA. I logged into AncestryDNA today. When I clicked on DNA Matches, I got a notice

Updates coming soon to DNA matches
We’re making changes that will improve the accuracy and quality of your DNA matches.

The notice includes a white paper – see link below. Believe the last white paper was released around 4 years ago.

Updates coming soon to DNA matches
As Ancestry continues to improve the accuracy of our DNA matching algorithms, we’ll be changing the way we calculate the amount of DNA you share with your matches (read our Matching White Paper). Here’s what these changes will mean for you.
More accurate number of shared segments
The DNA you share with a match is distributed across segments – short segments, long segments, or some combination of both. Our updated matching algorithm may reduce the estimated number of segments you share with some of your DNA matches. This doesn’t change the estimated total amount of shared DNA (measured in centimorgans/cM) or the predicted relationship to your matches.
See the length of your longest shared segment
The length of the longest segment you and a DNA match have in common can help determine if you’re actually related. The longer the segment, the more likely you’re related. Segment length is also the easiest way to evaluate the difference between multiple matches that all show the same estimated relationship. Our updated matching algorithm can show you the length of the longest segment you share with your matches.
Distant DNA matches must share 8 cM or higher
Our updated matching algorithm will increase the likelihood you are actually related to your very distant matches. As a result, you’ll no longer see matches (or be matched to people) that share less than 8 cM with you – unless you have added a note about them, added them to a custom group or have messaged them. These changes to the matching algorithm will reduce the total number of DNA matches you have and the number of new matches you will receive. It may also affect the number of ThruLines you may see.
FAQs
What changes will I see in my DNA matches?
You may see the number of segments you share with your DNA matches change. You will be able to see the length of the longest segment you share with your DNA matches. Very distant matches – those you share less than 8 cM of DNA with – will no longer appear in your DNA match list or in ThruLines™ unless you have added a note about them, added them to a group or have messaged them.
Why are you making these changes to DNA matches?
We’re continually working to find improved ways to make family history discoveries through DNA. We’ve updated our matching algorithm, which will improve the accuracy and quality of your DNA matches.
Are my matches more accurate now?
Yes. Although individual results may vary, more data and improved algorithms mean that we can better detect who you’re more likely to be related to.
When will you be making these changes to DNA matches?
These updates to DNA matches will happen in the beginning of August.
Will there be a way to save or download information about matches that share less than 8 cM of DNA with me?
There will not be a way to download information about these matches before the changes to our matching algorithm take place. If you have added a note about a match, added them to a group or messaged them, these matches will remain.
Does this change my ethnicity estimate or communities?
No, this update is for DNA matches only.
Will I get this update if I’m still waiting for my DNA results?
Yes. All AncestryDNA customers will get this update.
How do I see new DNA matches based on the new algorithm?
To see a list of new DNA matches, select “View All DNA Matches” from your DNA homepage, then select the “Unviewed” filter.
Can I see the notes for matches that have been removed from my list?
Matches that you share less than 8 cM of DNA with and have added a note about will remain in your DNA match list, so you will continue to be able to see notes you have added about them.
Can I see the messages I exchanged with a DNA match who has been removed from my list?
Matches that you share less than 8 cM of DNA with and have messaged will remain in your DNA match list, so you can continue to message those matches and see past messages.
Will this change affect my Thrulines™?
Since your ThruLines™ rely on DNA matches, you may see some changes.
Does this update change how you report the amount of segments shared between two individuals?
You may see the number of shared segments between you and your matches change.
Read more about how we estimate the number of shared segments.
Have you changed the amount of shared DNA needed to determine a match?
Yes, we’ve changed the amount of DNA you need to share to be considered a match with another individual to 8 cM.
Will my DNA match list change again?
Your DNA match list will continue to change as the science behind DNA matching continues to advance, and more people take DNA tests.

 

About Wichita Genealogist

Originally from Gulfport, Mississippi. Live in Wichita, Kansas now. I suffer Bipolar I, ultra-ultra rapid cycling, mixed episodes. Blog on a variety of topics - genealogy, DNA, mental health, among others. Let's collaborateDealspotr.com
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1 Response to AncestryDNA Follow-up – July 17, 2020

  1. Pingback: AncestryDNA Follow-up – July 30, 2020 | Ups and Downs of Family History V2.0

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