The power of uneasy conversations: How one London man was brought back from the brink of suicide — Wellbean blog

Trigger warning: This post contains a discussion about suicide which may upset certain readers. Do not read this post if you feel this may trigger you. On Time to Talk Day last week, I was thrilled to see how many people in my work place engaged with the activities of the day and shared their […]

via The power of uneasy conversations: How one London man was brought back from the brink of suicide — Wellbean blog

About ICT Genealogist

Originally from Gulfport, Mississippi. Live in Wichita, Kansas now. I suffer Bipolar I, ultra-ultra rapid cycling, mixed episodes. Blog on a variety of topics - genealogy, DNA, mental health, among others. Let's collaborateDealspotr.com
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9 Responses to The power of uneasy conversations: How one London man was brought back from the brink of suicide — Wellbean blog

  1. SLIMJIM says:

    Grateful for a life saved from suicide

    Liked by 1 person

    • Agreed. I worked for and volunteered at mental health agencies. Had a close client who moved from Wichita to Indiana years ago. Was shocked when his wife announced his suicide. He suffered Bipolar Depression and had been doing well for many years.

      Liked by 1 person

      • SLIMJIM says:

        I’m sorry to hear of his suicide =(

        Liked by 1 person

      • It was a shock as his Facebook posts had been positive for months. He suffered severe depression and I know a depressive episode can appear suddenly. I tend to watch if a person with depression or bipolar depression has a sudden positive upswing unexpectedly. It may be a front for hiding they are depressed.

        Liked by 1 person

      • SLIMJIM says:

        Good point for me to remember as a pastor

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, it is sometimes the subtle changes you have to watch for. With other people, it’s more obvious they are struggling. In my experience, I was able to pick up on some of the clues that therapists and psychiatrists missed as I do my best to listen to people. I have a 60% left ear and 40% right ear hearing loss and I haven’t found a hearing aid that helps so I listen harder to what people say. I can’t consciously read lips, but if I don’t try, I can usually piece together the gist of what has been said.

        Liked by 1 person

      • If you have a depressed church member who is normally talkative and they become less talkative, it may be a clue. I had clients who did this. Some were better liars than others, but I let their therapists and psychiatrists know what I saw and what the client told me. Thought it was the best way as they may be more familiar with a client.

        Liked by 1 person

      • SLIMJIM says:

        Another good insight

        Liked by 1 person

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