Laura / Pictinpa, pictink – Featured Blogger of the Week January 17, 2020

For this week’s Featured Blogger of the Week, I chose Laurahttps://pictinpa.wordpress.com/ and https://pictink.wordpress.com/.

Updated January 18, 2020 – added Instagram link.

About page  – https://pictink.wordpress.com/about/

About

Bio: I am from Scotland but moved to Pennsylvania, USA in October 2013. I maintain two blogs. pictinpa.wordpress.com documents my experiences as an immigrant exploring my new home, as a mother of a busy family and I also share my creative hobbies there. pictink.wordpress.com is dedicated solely to sharing my art work. Thanks for stopping by!

I have re-blogged several posts –

Rainbow Art Journal – Skeleton Deer — A Pict in PA. Original post: https://pictinpa.wordpress.com/2019/12/23/rainbow-art-journal-skeleton-deer/

Differences Between Books and Movies – November 7, 2019. Original post inspiration: https://pictinpa.wordpress.com/2019/11/07/jaws/

Star Wars #1 – Luke Skywalker on Tatooine — Pict Ink. Original post: https://pictink.wordpress.com/2020/01/13/star-wars-1-luke-skywalker-on-tatooine/

Drawlloween 2019 – Squonk — Pict Ink original post: https://pictink.wordpress.com/2019/10/12/drawlloween-2019-squonk/

She has some Cryptid/Cryptozoology posts:

https://pictink.wordpress.com/tag/cryptid/

https://pictink.wordpress.com/tag/cryptozoology/

https://pictinpa.wordpress.com/tag/cryptid/

Social Media Links: 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pict_ink/

Past Featured Bloggers of the Week: https://upsdownsfamilyhistory.wordpress.com/tag/featured-blogger-of-the-week/

 

 

About ICT Genealogist

Originally from Gulfport, Mississippi. Live in Wichita, Kansas now. I suffer Bipolar I, ultra-ultra rapid cycling, mixed episodes. Blog on a variety of topics - genealogy, DNA, mental health, among others. Let's collaborateDealspotr.com
This entry was posted in Bloggers, Social Media and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Laura / Pictinpa, pictink – Featured Blogger of the Week January 17, 2020

  1. Thank you so much for the compliment of featuring my blogs. I am glad you enjoy seeing my art work. I see you are looking for social media links. I also share my art work on Instagram as @pict_ink

    Liked by 1 person

    • I added the link to your Instagram account.

      You are welcome. I was glad to see you back posting. I realize you are busy with family and work on top of the art and posting you do.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you. Yes, always busy but my lack of blog interaction recently was because we lost our home internet connection. I am glad to be connected again. It was a frustrating week.

        Like

      • Sorry to hear that. I gave up home Internet years ago, other than my cell phone which has limited LTE and unlimited 2G once the LTE runs out. I try to avoid using my phone for posting. I use a friend’s house for some of my posting and a local Internet cafe that doesn’t mind me being there a lot.

        Liked by 1 person

      • It was a lesson in how dependent on internet access we have all become. I just accepted that my life was mostly lo-fi for a week and I handled essential stuff like email in my workplace. My kids, however, felt that their lives were in ruins without having internet.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I grew up pre-Internet and I agree on how Internet dependent children are these days. We were church mouse poor and we never got cable as keeping food on the table was a higher priority than cable. Lo-Fi can be a challenge, but I learned to adjust when I am at home. My first home Internet was WebTV for several years. It made Lo-Fi seemed speedy in comparison. It was owned by Microsoft, but many Microsoft company websites weren’t accessible on WebTV. I figured out early on if something wasn’t AOL compatible, it wasn’t WebTV compatible. I used to have cable Internet, but reached the point where keeping food on my table was more important. Thankfully, I have friends who sometimes let me use their faster Internet and my favorite Internet cafe doesn’t mind me being there as much as I am.

        Liked by 1 person

      • We had terrible internet when we lived in Scotland so my kids didn’t spend their early years with broadband or wifi or screens but my goodness have they adapted to life with all of these mod cons. As parents, we monitor their consumption and screen time but a week with zero access was as if we had pivoted them back to neanderthal times. Quite ridiculous.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I am glad you monitor them. Some friends don’t monitor their children, other than blocking them from YouTube, but then give the children their phones and other devices or let the children see their passwords, it’s meaningless to block YouTube.

        My daughter is in her 30s, but if I had Internet back when she was younger, I would monitor her usage and access. There are too many bad people out there willing to take advantage of people in general, and especially children not to monitor phone and Internet access. I had someone not monitoring her 17 year old daughter’s usage and next thing she knew, the daughter ran off with a married man. Thankfully, someone knew the guy was and turned the information over to the police so she was returned safely. The police had concerns because she dumped all electronic devices as soon as she disappeared.

        Liked by 1 person

      • That must have been a terrifying experience for your friend and traumatic for him and his daughter. I used to work in child protection and youth justice so I am maybe a bit more hyper vigilant about such things. Aside from safety and inappropriate content, I also want to make sure my kids are doing other things with their time.

        Liked by 1 person

      • For the one whose daughter wind up running away, the mother wised up and started monitoring usage.

        For two of my other friends who don’t monitor their children usage, honestly, I don’t think they realize the dangers and my warnings have fallen on deaf ears so often I stopped giving the warnings. It sinks in for maybe 5 minutes, but then they let the children use their devices unsupervised. They think their children are much better behaved than they are and wouldn’t do anything the parents tell them not to do. They blindly ignore how often the children do things they are told not to do.

        Maybe if one of the children does what a 6 year old did and runs up several hundred dollars in Amazon bills on her mother’s account, they will wake up and realize the danger before something far worse happens.

        I grew up in a cul-de-sac, not really a cul-de-sac, but a short-one block street. I had to cross a busy 4-lane U. S. highway to get to school, but our parents taught us to watch out for traffic. They also warned us about the houses we should avoid. They never said pedophiles or similar terms, but as an adult, I realized that’s what they meant about not going over to that person’s house.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. SLIMJIM says:

    Going to take a nap from all my sermon prep!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.