Using Regimental Histories to discover your ancestor’s war First World War Regimental histories can reveal some fascinating details for family historians tracing their ancestors in World War I. – The Genealogist September 26, 2019

I saw this on The Genealogist recently – Using Regimental Histories to discover your ancestor’s war – First World War Regimental histories can reveal some fascinating details for family historians tracing their ancestors in World War I: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2019/using-regimental-histories-to-discover-your-ancestors-war-1187/

These publications often provide details of battles and campaigns that the regiments were involved in and also lists the officers, and in some cases the men. They typically include various details relating to honours and medals awarded in the conflict. These military histories concentrate on a particular regiment, battalion or division and typically give a good account of the men’s progress across the battlefield usually including maps for better understanding the geography.

Most of these narratives will also name men and officers who had distinguished themselves on the battlefield and so if your soldier ancestor had been involved in some action at the time, that deserved a mention, then these records could fill in the story of their war for you.

–snip–

 

 

About Wichita Genealogist

Originally from Gulfport, Mississippi. Live in Wichita, Kansas now. I suffer Bipolar I, ultra-ultra rapid cycling, mixed episodes. Blog on a variety of topics - genealogy, DNA, mental health, among others. Let's collaborateDealspotr.com
This entry was posted in Bloggers, Genealogy, Military History. Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Using Regimental Histories to discover your ancestor’s war First World War Regimental histories can reveal some fascinating details for family historians tracing their ancestors in World War I. – The Genealogist September 26, 2019

  1. SLIMJIM says:

    Interesting use of regimental histories

    Liked by 1 person

    • In my case, I had a great-grandfather’s brother killed in the Civil War. People wrongly assumed he fought in the 18th Pennsylvania. He didn’t, turns out he signed up for the U. S. Regular Army’s 18th, a completely different unit. I couldn’t find him in the 18th Pennsylvania, but when I widened my search, I found him in the 18th U. S. Regular Army.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.