It’s Your Blog – Run How You Want July 30, 2019

Standard Disclaimer:

I am not an attorney and any comments I post are not intended, nor should they be construed, as legal advice. If you need legal advice, please consult a legal expert who is familiar with the area of legal expertise you need.

This blog post is in response to a re-blog post that I re-blogged – Blog Comments and Censorship — Mental Health @ Home. Original post: https://mentalhealthathome.org/2019/07/30/blog-comments-and-censorship/.

You are free to run your blog / vlog however you want to, but be aware that there can be consequences for allowing comments that you don’t monitor. In the original post, a point was made about copyright. It’s a valid point and something lost on many bloggers and vloggers. I regularly see copyright violations on blogs, YouTube, and other video sites.

If you violate copyright enough on YouTube, you get sent to Copyright School: https://www.youtube.com/copyright_school. Do it enough times and you may find yourself getting banned from YouTube. I was curious so I voluntarily went to Copyright School. End result – some of their points are not clear or don’t go far enough.

I have rules for comments on my blog: no profanity (feel free to do the comic strip route of @%&* if you feel the need to cuss in a comment. Two, no politics and I don’t care if it’s attacking/defending a politician where I would agree with your points. Respect – this is my blog; treat me with disrespect and don’t expect your comment to get approved. I have no problem with agree to disagree comments if they are respectful. Religion kind of depends as some points I wouldn’t have an issue with and some I would.I have a pretty thick skin as a result of being bullied when I was younger, but that doesn’t mean I am going to let someone try and bully me on my blog. You don’t have to agree with what I post, but as Ashley pointed out, this isn’t your blog. As some of the commenters have said, don’t like it, post it on your own blog.

I was an admin, but not site owner of a PC gaming forum. When I was made moderator and later admin, I had one rule of thumb. I would stay with the site as long as I was not ashamed of how the site was going. Over 10+ years ago, the site owner added a private  board that was only available to those who had reached so many posts or comments. Initially, it went well. However, a few years later, the site owner decided to turn this private board into a flame board. He wanted to generate more interest in the forums, but the way he worded the board description, it was obvious it was a flame board. The site had been known as a site where respect was not only expected, it happened. However, once the private board became a flame board, that went out the window. I wasn’t the only one who left. I believe a fair number of people left as the attitude of those who participated in the flame board had a bad habit of spilling over into the other boards.

When I comment on other bloggers or vloggers walls, I do my best to be respectful and observe any known rules and other common courtesy things. Same for when I post on social media.

I will say if you don’t know why you should approve comments, Ashley mentions the “NYC Midnight forum” as an example. I am not familiar with that forum, but have seen similar forums in PC gaming sites where flame wars were the norm.

 

 

About ICT Genealogist

Originally from Gulfport, Mississippi. Live in Wichita, Kansas now. Let's collaborateDealspotr.com
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