My Unknown Finnish DNA Roots

In general, I ignore DNA ethnicity levels below the continental level (Asia, Europe, Africa, Australia, North America, South America, and Antartica). However, at a young age, I have been drawn to Finland. I have no known Finnish connections in my genealogy. If  you look at my Finnish percentages from these two posts: My GEDmatch Admixture Results and Ignore Ethnic Results Below the Continental Level summarized below, I range from 0% Finnish to a high of 33% (combined among other national groups). I figure one day DNA ethnicity percentages at the national level may reach the ability to be a lot more accurate than what is currently available.

In the first link above, there are only two mentions of Finnish:

23andMe 0% Finnish

Eurogenes K12b Admixture Proportions 6.99% Finnish

Moving onto the second link above, there are six (6) references to Finnish:

#3 (23andMe, v3 chip – before the April 2018 update; latest update is January 2019, see below):

Finnish: 0%*

(*Scandinavian 1.5%)

#6 (DNATribes – broken down several ways)

Finnish 11.2%

#9 WeGene (1 of 2):

Finnish/Russian 19.95%

#10 WeGene (2 of 2 – don’t remember which is which, but one was Ancestry transfer and the other was 23andMe)

Finnish/Russian 25.39%

#14 Insitome Regional Ancestry
Finnish 1%
#15 DNAPassport
North Europe 33% (British, Irish, Finnish)
On FamilySearch earlier today, I came across three (3) articles –
Finnish Family History Research: Where to Start: https://www.familysearch.org/blog/en/finnish-genealogy-research/
In 2005, I was able to spend about a week in Helsinki, Finland for a work-related conference. It was a fun trip and I had some free time to visit several places – Suomenlinna Fortress in Helsinki with submarine nearby; the Helsinki Zoo, a harbor tour, seeing a Festival of the Midnight Sun.

 

 

About ICT Genealogist

Originally from Gulfport, Mississippi. Live in Wichita, Kansas now. Let's collaborateDealspotr.com
This entry was posted in Autosomal DNA, DNA, FamilySearch, Genealogy, genealogy, History, History and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.