Video of Diving B-29 in Lake Mead

Diving the B-29 in Lake Mead is no longer allowed (diving last stopped in January 2018), but it had been allowed in the past. In case you’re wondering how a B-29 wound up in Lake Mead, here’s the story: https://www.nps.gov/lake/learn/historic-b-29-bomber.htm. The link includes a YouTube video that can also be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXbwEpTfIkk&feature=youtu.be (it’s a hair over 10 minutes long). You can also read more about the story on Wikipedia.

For those wanting to see a B-29, there are two flying B-29’s, Fifi (link includes a schedule of where Fifi will be touring) and Doc (has an Events tab where you can see Doc’s schedule), and a number of static displays: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_Boeing_B-29_Superfortresses.

Of the 3,970 built, 26 survive in complete form today, 24 of which reside in the United States, and two of which are airworthy.

Here are the location of known wrecked B-29s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_Boeing_B-29_Superfortresses#Known_wrecks (the Lake Mead wreck entry needs updating as dives are no longer allowed to it).

Historic meeting of Fifi and Doc: https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/general-aviation/2017-07-26/historic-meeting-b-29s-fifi-and-doc.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in History, Military History, World War II. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.