Genes for Good Facebook App

When I first heard about the Genes for Good DNA test, the University of Michigan was only offering a chance for a free DNA kit with a maximum cap of 20,000 free DNA kits. To qualify (this was several years ago, but the requirements are only slightly higher now – current requirements found at https://genesforgood.sph.umich.edu/participate), I had to complete so many Health History Surveys (the, and all Health Tracking Surveys on two different days. It appears they have received additional funding or a way to provide more free kits as they are over 27,000 processed kits.

The Spit Kit

As you complete Health History and Health Tracking Surveys, your information will be entered into a research database where it can help us understand the links between different aspects of health, behavior and environment. Our goal is to combine these data with genetic information to truly accelerate and extend health research. In our initial round of genetic analysis, we focus on participants who have completed the majority of their Health History Surveys and have completed Health Tracking Surveys across several different days. (At the time of this writing you must complete 15 Health History Surveys and 20 Health Tracking Surveys, although this is subject to change as more surveys become available.)

To sign up, you have to do it on Facebook and that’s also where you fill out the Tracking and History surveys: https://app.genesforgood.org/app.php#content-home. Once you complete the minimum number of both surveys, then your badge will turn from Bronze to Silver and you can let them know where to send your spit kit.

Once you get your results, you can download the raw data, but it’s a pretty large file. My zipped Genes for Good file is around 229.6 MB.

From the Readme file that’s part of the zipped file,

Files 1-4 contain different formats of the list of about 500,000 positions in your DNA (your genotypes) directly measured by software at Genes for Good. The genotypes are quality-controlled but we have made no attempt to interpret your genotypes. For example, we have not attempted to figure out which genotypes may carry disease risk.

Files 5-8 contain your imputed genotypes. That means we estimated genotypes at an additional 7 million positions by comparing your directly measured genotypes to a set of 2,500 people whose genotypes have already been determined, and filling in the best guesses for your DNA bases we did not directly measure. Because these files contain imputed and not directly measured genotypes, there is a greater chance of errors. Also, some text editors may not be able to open these files because of their larger size.

File 9 is this README file.

– – – – (snip)

Files 1-4 contain different formats of the list of about 500,000 positions in your DNA (your genotypes) directly measured by software at Genes for Good. The genotypes are quality-controlled but we have made no attempt to interpret your genotypes. For example, we have not attempted to figure out which genotypes may carry disease risk.

Files 5-8 contain your imputed genotypes. That means we estimated genotypes at an additional 7 million positions by comparing your directly measured genotypes to a set of 2,500 people whose genotypes have already been determined, and filling in the best guesses for your DNA bases we did not directly measure. Because these files contain imputed and not directly measured genotypes, there is a greater chance of errors. Also, some text editors may not be able to open these files because of their larger size.

File 9 is this README file.

While you can’t upload your Genes for Good raw data directly to GEDmatch, I believe you can upload it to GEDmatch Genesis or at least some have reported doing it (I haven’t so I can’t verify it and I am not sure which file I would need to upload to Genesis to get it to work), a beta version of GEDmatch for file formats not currently uploadable to the main GEDmatch website.

Here are some YouTube videos for uploading Genes for Good to GEDmatch (may need to change the instructions to using Genesis instead of regular GEDmatch if the video doesn’t specifically address Genesis) and Genes for Good to DNA.Land.

I don’t think there’s an easy way to generate a file that would be compatible with being able to transfer your Genes for Good raw data to WeGene, MyHeritageDNA, or FamilyTree DNA (FTDNA), but some enterprising individual or company may come up with one down the road.

 

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This entry was posted in DNA.Land, Facebook, FamilyTree DNA, GEDmatch, GEDmatch Genesis, Genes for Good, MyHeritage, Social Media, WeGene. Bookmark the permalink.

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