Historian Ed Bearss Throws Out First Pitch

If you notice the background on my blog, specifically this part, you may wonder why I chose it. There’s a reason and the reason it tied to the individual, Ed Bearss, that is the focus of this blog post.

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I had a chance to hear Ed Bearss speak back in 2013. He was doing a presentation June 27, 2013 at a local DAV. It’s was one of the most interesting presentations I have ever heard, but for a slightly different reason than you would expect. And it’s also why I chose the above photo as my background. On June 13, 2013, the area experienced a storm, not readily visible from my photo, but I took it a few minutes before walking into Ed’s presentation. The parking lot was full which I took to be a good sign. since one of the biggest effects of the storm caused large areas of the city to have no power, but it was sporadic. I left an area near where I am typing this blog post and it had power. As I entered into the DAV, the first thing I noticed was no power and a handful of candles lighting the room. I was a few minutes late arriving. Ed was 90 at the time, but his voice was strong and carried well into a somewhat large room. It almost felt like we were in the time period as he was talking about a Civil War battle.

He had prepared a PowerPoint presentation for the occasion. The lack of power made the PowerPoint presentation unusable. Yet, it didn’t phase Ed or stop him from giving a great presentation. If you had heard the presentation without knowing the power was out, you wouldn’t have known the difference.

Here’s the article I saw today that led to this post: https://www.battlefields.org/news/historian-ed-bearss-throw-out-first-pitch-inaugural-all-star-armed-services-classic.

There have been several attempts to award Ed a Congressional Gold Medal, but so far I don’t think it has happened. Near as I can tell, the last attempt was in 2017 and here’s the PDF on it: https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr1225/BILLS-115hr1225ih.pdf. Wikipedia has more information, but see the note

This article is written like laudatory, non-neutral introductory essay with only broken URL sources, and so all quotes unattributed, all content unverifiable that states a Wikipedia editor’s personal feelings about a topic. Please help improve it by rewriting it in an encyclopedic style. (March 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

A search using your preferred browser search engine will give you a lot of information on Ed and you can also see if he will be doing a presentation in your area.

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This entry was posted in Congressional Gold Medal, History, Military History, WBTS/ACW, World War II. Bookmark the permalink.

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